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20121006
20121006
SHOW
STATION
SFGTV2 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
a moment and say a prayer of thanks for the environment we live in. for all of us who touch bay area real estate, it's really incredible how quickly things have changed. if you go back two, two and a half years and think about what the environment was in the middle of 2010, we were in a terrible environment. values were down significantly. we couldn't lease space it save ourselves and we felt it would be a long, long slug to come out of the hole we were in. here we are, barely two years later, in one of the strongest office markets in the country. the growth for is overwhelming a shrinking of real estate needs and we're not seeing that kind of growth in new york or washington. it's very select markets that we're seeing the kind of growth that you are seeing in san francisco. so we all should be grateful that we work in this very unique and interesting environment. i am also grateful to jerry and rob speyer for driving this company that can take on and capitalize projects. there are few companies able to do this. i feel very lucky to be part of such a strong and wonderful team and to work
of opportunities there. we know something about making urban environments vital. given the present political move, people are open to new ideas. that is true across the country. our burners are being asked to come into centers of various cities for aetna. -- right now. whehowever, as soon as things gt better, they are escorted out. but we might begin to break that cycle. it is just wonderful to walk out on the street and see the world walking by. >> are you giving the twitter deal? >> yes, we are. we just founded a new nonprofit. black rock arts foundation, which is dedicated to spreading interactive, a collaborative art throughout the world. now we have founded but we call the burning and project. -- what we call the burning man project. it eventually leads to the event itself. this is a wonderful opportunity. the thing about burning man, when you look at the variety of people that go there, when you look at this environment, where all the normal boundaries are down in every department of human knowledge and endeavor. if you ask what possible application that we have created that may be useful l
this opportunity to kind of examine what is going on in our real estate environment, and in particular, to thank the san francisco business times for putting on this event. and i think for most of us in this room, we rely very heavily on the san francisco business times to keep track of what is going on in san francisco, and the greater bay area, in the real estate world. and it is the best source of that information for all of us. mary asked me if i would make a few observations about the general state of the real estate economy here in san francisco and as i do that, i always have to think about what to say that mary hasn't already said about it. and if you look at the real estate economy generally in our nation, and the fact that it is still soft. that we still need more jobs. that there is a recovery, but it's a slow recovery. you can't do that without thinking gee, will i sound like a politician for one or the other major political parties? and so i will steer clear of that and focus instead on san francisco and maybe we're living in a bubble, but it's a pretty wonderful bubble to be living
in an environment -- people will always give to a greater gift. it is just a principle. if a group get together to give a gift to an entire city, it is easy to find people who will give to that. and the consequence is, you can learn a lot. talk about a networking opportunity. but nobody ever went there to network. they went out there to give their energy, imagination, their heart to something. >> there is that collaboration, the cross-disciplinary thing that happens out there, but i also feel like there is a bit of a sense of competition. people are trying to outdo each other, try to outdo each other trt impressive thing. >> that is human nature. i read a few years ago somebody complaining, i remember the good old days. you could put up a pink flamingo in front of your tent and it was cool. now with all of these big projects, i feel few tile -- futile. well, they learned the wrong lesson. the interesting thing is, people say that they are connected, but in an environment like that, it is easy to get connected. it is easy to get help. unless you insist on being the leader, you will find somethin
-tech companies, the creative workforces, who now want to live and work in urban environments, interact with their environments instead of work in suburban campuses that are fairly sterile and isolated. and that phenomenon has been going on to some time, but what really brought home some of the changes to me was a talk i heard earlier this week by alexa arena talking about the 5m project at 6th and mission, the conversion of the chronicle building and plant surrounding areas. and she talked about the design process as being one of going out to constituencies, potential constituencies, focus groups, listening to people, trying to find out what they were looking for in collaborative, interactive work environments. and bringing the city into those work environments, and the connection and the need for amenities like cultural amenities and the arts and food and all of those kinds of things. and so instead of it being design professionals and people in the real estate industry sort of imposing on the world what they think the world wants, it is sort of coming the other direction. if that is,
and innovate our new ideas for the new economy and our mutual obligations on the environment, and then there is something that paris and san francisco hold very dearly and that's an ongoing conversation about our human rights as world leaders, so it's human rights, it's the environment, it's the economy and these are the reasons why we hold our relationship with paris and with all the other great cities of the world in a sister city relationship so dearly, we learn from each other, we send delegations to each other, we welcome each other to the city but in each and every instance, we are always thinking about ideas about how we can help each other and help regions improve, so i am excited to have met with the mayor just a few minutes ago to reaffirm our relationship and we'll sign that in a few moments to document that and to promise each other that we will continue this very great relationship and we could not have done it without the involvement of our private citizens, tom horn has led a fantastic group of volunteers on our sister city committee for paris and san francisc
to many of these toxins for young girls and more exposures to the environment as hair dyes get into the waterway and food even if we don't get our hair dyed. our skin should be lighter and darkers, smoother, lips plumper, these companies have so much power over our minds, public space and sense of self as they continue to expose us to chemicals even though safer alternatives are available. we have the power. we have the power to decide which products we put on our body and which companies we support with our money. that is actually a real power that can feel very very good when you start to take advantage of it. ahrolt a lot of this information is scary and real. i tell people, i do get to the good news around chapter 10. there is a lot of good news to share. i have heard so many amazing stories along the way. 30 cities in 13 states. 3,000 people come out to these talks. there is just an amazing energy. and so many just wonderful store reus about people engaging in this work, people who have been to skin deep and start their own company or change their major. people making rad
. [ laughter ] i feel very fortunate to work in this environment, to work for a great company and most importantly to get to work with all of you everyday. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> thank you, carl. now we're going to move from the talk about the tech explosion to one of our most significant economic generators, which is the hospitality industry and i think we're going to have some breaking news this morning, if i can call it that. and see some of the first visuals of the moscone center expansion. at least i think so. so we're so fortunate -- i'm not going to waste a lot of time on the introduction, but have i to say that joe, president and ceo of sf travel association, formerly san francisco convention bureau is one of the leaders of the city and has done so much for the industry and for sf travel. and he is going to tell you about the plans for the moscone center expansion. he has done so much and created the san francisco tourism improvement district in 2009 and that actually is helping fund this whole structure. so i'm just going to let joe dallesandro. [ applause ]
do under a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful.
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)